Home - Co-Creator Radio NetworkShow ScheduleShows & ArchivesGuests of Co-Creator Radio NetworkCalendar - Directory - ForumVideos - Music - MoreFrequently Asked QuestionsContact Us
 
Bookmark and Share          Upcoming ShowsShow Hosts & ArchivesArchive Conference Presenters
 
 
Winamp Player for Broadband Connections
Windows Media Player for Broadband Connections
itunes Player for Broadband Connections
Real Player for Broadband Connections

Listen Now
Flash Player - PC
iPad - iPhone - Mac

on Tunein Radio

Winamp Player for DIAL-UP Connections
Windows Media  Player for DIAL-UP Connections
tunes  Player for DIAL-UP Connections
Real  Player for DIAL-UP Connections

Broadband choices for
PC's
or MAC's

Lower-speed choices for
PC's or MAC's
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


Tuesdays at 2 pm EST - 1 pm CST - 12 noon MST - 11 am PST


2010 Archives

2017 - 2016 - 2015- 2014 - 2013 - 2012 - 2011- 2010



  • December 28, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Vitality and Life Force of Your Purpose

    At the core of well-being is the cultivation of right relationship with your self. Shaman and host, Christina Pratt explains that, from a shamanic perspective, right relationship with your self involves your physical and mental health as well as your engagement with others, with your environment, and with the spirit world. And all of this is put into context by one thing—your unique genius or soul’s purpose. Well-being in all of these areas can be cultivated when we feel vitality and energy. And when we don’t feel our vitality, even getting out of bed feels impossible. Our vitality and life force rise and fall relative to how close or far away we are from our soul’s purpose. As we set our focus on living our purpose in the coming year we draw inspiration from the words of Martha Graham, “There is a vitality, a life force, an energy, a quickening that is translated through you into action. And because there is only one of you in all of time, this expression is unique. And if you block it, it will never exist through any other medium and it will be lost. The world will not have it. It is not your business to determine how good it is, or how valuable, or how it compares with other expressions. It is your business to keep it yours clearly and directly, to keep the channel open.”.

  • December 21, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Ethics and the First Shaman

    “The ethics of shamanic practice were brought by the First Shaman who was of Divine origins and not entirely human. The First Shaman brought knowledge and the skills across that broken bridge between the Creator to the humans in each shamanic lineage,” explains shaman and host, Christina Pratt. “The First Shaman brings the teachings necessary for survival in all aspects of daily life, both ordinary and non-ordinary. The First shaman brought the teachings for how to live in good relationship with ones self, with each other, with the Ancestors and the beings of the spirit world, and with the physical environment. Cultures, traditions, and civilizations were all built on the knowledge brought by the First Shaman. The First Shaman taught the next shaman, a human shaman, how to work with the spirits, conduct ritual and ceremony and to serve the people. This is important for us as contemporary shamans to realize. Each shaman, though human, endeavored to walk the path of that First god-like shaman. From this effort comes the morals and the ethics of the practice as well as the continual need for personal sacrifice, cleansing, and ongoing transformation to stay on that path.

  • December 14, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Shamanic Inheritance with Jonathan Horwitz
    “The shaman works by asking for help,” explains Jonathan Horwitz, co-founder of the Scandinavian Centre for Shamanic Studies with Annette Høst. “We never get anywhere alone. We’re always being helped, although often we do not recognize… The shamanic path is excellent for learning to re-connect with being alive, re-discover the spiritual power we are all born with, and to re-learn what it means to be a part of the whole.” Join us this week as host Christina Pratt explores our “shamanic inheritance” with Jonathan Horwitz, the plenary speaker for the 2010 UK Society of Shamanic Practitioners Conference. Jonathan is an elder and teacher in the UK, Scandinavia, Russia, and Hungary. He joins us for the next show in the Society of Shamanic Practitioners sponsored interview series. In this series we explore how contemporary shamans are meeting the challenge of their world where the relations of things are profoundly out of balance. It is the ancient role of the shaman in all cultures to tend the balance of things. How are these shaman meeting this extraordinary need today?

  • December 7, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    The Shaman’s Heart
    The shaman’s heart is an awakened heart. The path the shaman walks to free the heart offers a metaphor for each of us to find the courage to heal our broken heartedness and step into spiritual adulthood. “Contemporary life can break your heart on any day,” explains shaman and host, Christina Pratt. “And from that wreckage most of us learn to stand in our own way, habitually, practically, and fearfully rationalizing why we remain disengage from our heart and the hearts of others.” What the shaman knows is that while the broken heart is real, the story that we wrap around it is not. If we have the courage to unwrap the story and feel again, we return to reality. In reality the heart contains its own medicine to heal. Where the heart has been emptied by grief and loss, it can be freed to fill its great depths again. Where the heart has closed in fear and protection it can be opened by the wisdom of what truly matters. Where the heart is weak with the struggles of life it can find power in honoring the essence of life. Join us this week as we explore how to engage the medicine of the heart to heal and allow the energies of the heart to flow with passion in our lives.

  • November 30, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    What do you ask a shaman?

    Can shamanism help with mental illness? What about my depression? Am I cheating myself out of healing by taking my pharmaceuticals? Can you heal my father’s dementia? Does shamanic healing work long distance? How do I “pay the rent” with powerful psychoactive plants and stay in good relationship with the spirit world? Why does gratitude matter? Tune in this week for answers to these and many other listener questions. Shaman and host, Christina Pratt, explains, “Many of the questions we receive are thoughtful and complex. They come in after the shows, via email. This show is dedicated to circling back around to answer many of them.” We will clarify what a shaman means when they say that experiential learning “writes on your bones” and why that matters. We will explore the difference between “entering the Void” and moving in the Taoistic nature of things. Finally, we will look at how shamans understand that while we are not our body, the fact that we are here in a body is essential to living our soul’s purpose and doing what we have come into this life to do.


  • November 23, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Shamanic Healing for Animals

    Have you ever wondered if shamanic healing might help your animal or pet? Join us this week as host and shaman, Christina Pratt speaks with Carla Meeske, the shaman who pioneered Shamanic Method for Animal Communication. Shamanic healing with animals is the same in many ways as it is with humans. Animals lose soul parts and take on invasive energies, for example, just like humans do. At the same time, animals are different. They have animal tribes with members in the physical world and the invisible world, deeply interwoven soul stories with their humans, and they don’t carry ancestral illnesses as humans do. Shamanic healing for animals gives the humans a way to know what a pet feels and needs to bring an animal relief. Often this healing involves giving the human rich advice from the animal. Shamanic skills also give humans a way to attend compassionately and completely to the dying and death of a beloved pet. Join us as we explore the rich and extraordinary gifts that come to us from our animals and their shamanic healing.


  • November 16, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Tom Cowan: Conflux of Power

    Tom Cowan joins host, Christina Pratt, to explore the art of “standing in the conflux of power.” This traditional role of the shaman involved moving between forces, holding dynamic tensions, and finding balance in opposition. Tom joins us to explore how shamans practice this art today—or need to—when working in contemporary waking states of chaos like in war and large scale disasters, whether natural or man-made. Tom will share the timeless value in remembering ancient wisdom and embracing sovereignty as we seek to be wise and effective in the face of life’s challenges. Tom is a much loved teacher, an internationally respected author of many books, lecturer, and a founding board member of the SSP. He joins us for the next show in the Society of Shamanic Practitioners sponsored interview series where we explore how contemporary shamans are meeting the challenge of their world where the relations of things—the living and the dead, the humans and nature, and Western Way and the spirit world—are profoundly out of balance. It is the ancient role of the shaman in all cultures to tend the balance of things. How are these shaman meeting this extraordinary need today?


  • November 9, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Choosing a Shamanic Teacher

    How do we choose a shamanic teacher? And do we choose, or do the teachers select us? What should you look for? What are the signs that there might be problems lying just under the surface? And what if no teacher comes when the student is ready? Join host and shaman, Christina Pratt, as we navigate these tricky waters. Entering into shamanic training is not a decision to take lightly. Authentic training will take years and will come with no guarantees, which means that your relationship with your teacher will be a long-term relationship. How do you discern the difference between charisma and the passion of a teacher who comes from the heart? True teachers connect us to rivers. They connect us to a flow of information that existed before the teacher and will continue to flow after we are gone. The purpose of a teacher is to help us to use the river to create a more essential, authentic expression of our self. Learning from a really good teacher is like being carried in the current of a river directly into the self.


  • November 2, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Oral Traditions in a Virtual World

    In an oral tradition no reproduction of the teaching is allowed in any form; not written, recorded, filmed, txted or put up on youtube. This is unimaginable today, yet some things remain inaccessible to us unless we are willing to engage in the old ways. “Traditionally,” host and shaman, Christina Pratt explain, “the form served the teachings. Today the student expects the form to serve him and in that to be fast, convenient, and cheap.” In an oral tradition the student must be present to learn and willing to be present again and again, to repeat the experience until the teachings are mastered. The US military found that experiential teaching is the most profound way to shape and transform the core of an individual. This is true in large part because the mind doesn’t distinguish clearly between visual realities and thus learns deeply in physical, virtual, and dream state realities. Is listening to a concert CD/DVD the same experience as witnessing a live performance? Can the virtual world replace the power of experiential, oral traditions or does the actual physical experience matter. And, does the teacher matter? What does the virtual world have to give back to the soul of the student?


  • October 26, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    The Feast in Loneliness

    The fall is a time of rich harvest in the northern hemisphere. It is also a time that people begin to feel lonely and depressed. As the days grow shorter and the skies cloudier the people grow sadder. “This is one of those mysterious things,” explains host and shaman, Christina Pratt, “where the current person’s experience is opposite of the traditional person in a shamanic culture. I find these places where we have swung 180 degrees interesting and seething with potential.” Traditionally this is a time of community celebrating the harvest, working together to set up stores of the long winter ahead, and personally completing projects to prepare for the dark time, before going within to rest and rejuvenate. When loneliness rises to the surface of our awareness it is a voice calling out for the feast, the harvest of the life at this time and the community to celebrate with. Loneliness is also the voice calling you inward to your internal community, to attend to the inner projects abandoned half-done and the promises broken. When loneliness rises, listen; do not turn away. Loneliness can be the guide to that pure place of rejuvenation and restoration called Alone.


  • October 19, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Shamanic Awakenings

    Leo Rutherford, co-founder of the Eagle’s Wing College of Shamanic Medicine in England, joins host and shaman, Christina Pratt, for our series of Society of Shamanic Practitioners sponsored interview shows. Joan Halifax opened Leo’s path to shamanism in 1980 while he was studying Holistic Psychology in San Francisco, CA. Since then he has studied with a wide variety of teachers, written several books on shamanism, and co-founded Eagles’ Wing College in 1985. Leo explains that the ultimate purpose of shamanic skills is to help us to see the hidden causal interactions in the non-manifest world that create the manifest world in which we live. Thus we can learn to use these ancient skills to align with our true beliefs and deepest dreams. Join us this week as we welcome one of the elders of shamanism in the UK and explore how contemporary shamans are meeting the challenge of their world where the relations of things—the living and the dead, the humans and nature, and Western Way and the spirit world—are profoundly out of balance. It is the ancient role of the shaman in all cultures to tend the balance of things. How are these shaman meeting this extraordinary need today?


  • October 12, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Shamanism and Cancer

    Shamanic practices can have an affect on cancer and the healing process. This week host and shaman, Christina Pratt, explores a variety of ways shamanic healing has been part of successful recoveries from a cancer diagnosis. In any discussion of cancer it is important to remember that there are many different forms of cancer and that shamanism is part of—not instead of—other paths of treatment. At the most basic level people diagnosed with cancer visit a shaman to determine the true diagnosis and answer the question, “Why specifically do I have this cancer at this time and what do I do about it?” Others may approach a shaman, particularly “sucking doctors,” to draw the malignant energy out of the body and allow the body to heal. Others, who know how to journey them selves have work with their own helping spirits in a wide array of creative and successful journeys to healing. Tying all of these approaches together is the idea that one is not at war with cancer or the body. But that illness is an opportunity to look deeply at what we need to do to come into balance with our whole self and harmony with our life and the world around us.


  • October 5, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Energy Exchange and Ayni

    A lovely man from France informed me that my Encyclopedia could be pirated for free on the Internet. My initial response was to be flattered. My second thought was, well, good luck with that… To take without an exchange of energy never, ever goes well. To be out of balance in this way is to be in debt in this world or the spirit world and is one of the main reasons that one’s spirit gets stuck in the land of the living at death, unable to complete the journey to the other side. “Reciprocity and gratitude,” explains, shaman and host, Christina Pratt, “is at the core of a true shamanic stance in the world. Called ayni in Quechua, this concept is largely untranslatable to the capitalist, me first world.” It is critically important that we value gratitude and express it openly for all things that move our hearts. This is the reciprocity—that we allow ourselves to actually be moved into action by the things that move us—that we must value. There must always be an exchange of energy we are not balanced and we are not practicing shamanism. Without ayni the energies do not flow between people, between people and other living things, and ultimately between the realms. Without flow we are consistently and horribly out of balance. This week we explore energy exchange as a necessary part of balance and well-being.


  • September 28, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    What is a Shaman?

    What is a shaman? Host and shaman, Christina Pratt, freshly inspired by the diversity and community synergy of the UK Shamanic Conference, will explore this most interesting question. It is not true that every energy practitioner today is a shaman because not every altered state is a shamanic altered state. And something isn’t shamanic just because you don’t understand it or have a name for it. In this time when anyone can call themselves a shaman, what is a shaman? A shaman is a particular type of practitioner who works in an induced shamanic trance state with invisible and reliable energy beings. With the assistance of these invisible beings the shaman makes changes in the invisible world that create the desired changes here in the physical world. And the shaman does this work in response to the need to set things; people, communities, earth energies, what have you, into right relationship with the Greater Flow of life force energy. Shamans are called by Spirit and initiated through that relationship. And, traditionally shamans have worked with other types of healers in their communities. This week we will explore what this definition actually means in the past and the present, how you might select a shaman, and why even shamans argue about who is a shaman.


  • September 21, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Ubuntu Means Humanity

    John Lockley, a senior shaman in the Xhosa lineage of South Africa is our guest this week. John is one of the first white men in recent history to become a fully initiated Xhosa Sangoma, meaning seers, dreamers or prophets – they are the traditional healers of South Africa. John explains, “My journey is about reconciliation and part of my job is to help heal the past. When people are more connected with their own spirits, there is less of a desire to destroy or put down another. I don’t intend to bring Xhosa or South African shamanic culture to the West as such, but rather to use its essence – the techniques of prayer, dream work and connection to nature – to help people connect with their own ancestors and spiritual traditions.” John joins host, Christina Pratt, for the first of our series of Society of Shamanic Practitioners sponsored shows. Through these monthly shows we explore how contemporary shamans are meeting the challenge of their world where the relations of things—the living and the dead, the humans and nature, and Western Way and the spirit world—are profoundly out of balance. It is the ancient role of the shaman in all cultures to tend the balance of things. How are these shaman meeting this extraordinary need today?


  • September 14, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Small Acts of Power

    Shamanically speaking, what is happening in our country is the dismantling of our shared False Self, explains host and shaman, Christina Pratt. Do you want to rebuild a system based on fear and unsustainable ideas about the world we live in or do you want to co-create a new system based on our understanding of what does and clearly does not work? Now is the moment for you to choose. Love or Fear? More importantly you are choosing now in every act you take and don’t take. Join us this week as we explore small acts of power. Our small acts of power are everywhere all day long. The most effective begin by co-creating with Spirit. This week we explore how to make these acts of power in the physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual dynamics of your life. Allow yourself the time, through small powerful acts, to connect with the Sacred, to cultivate relationships with the Essence energies that give your life meaning, to risk allowing yourself to love, and give your body what it needs to carry you on this journey. You do not know what is ahead. But you can trust that your life will become what you are cultivating now. Choose well and tend to the small acts of power everyday.


  • September 7, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Small Sacred Things

    “That which is sacred possesses within it The Mystery,” explains host and shaman, Christina Pratt. While what we find sacred in a religious sense varies, that which is sacred in life touches all of us equally. These everyday sacred things, acts, or moments are the things, acts, or moments that contain The Great Mystery, no matter how large or small, no matter your religious focus or lack of a spiritual life. This week we explore the shamanic and Taoist teaching that we all need to tend the sacred to nourish our souls. Your soul is not a given. It is shaped by the choices you make in this life. Like all aspects of who you are, your soul needs nourishment. It needs exercise. It needs rest and restoration. To feed the sacred through small acts each day is to feed Spirit, which is to feed your spirit, which nourishes your soul. These are small ways of noticing and offering gratitude, yet each act connects us to that which abides. When we notice and honor the sacred, we turn our attention to the real energies. When we do this—right in the middle of a busy day, after sending the kids to school, or before we check out at night into the electronic media of choice—we are not lost in the infinite distractions of the day. We can step back from our state of perpetual overwhelm and step into the calm in the eye of the storm of our lives.


  • August 31, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Shamanism and Love

    Why would the spirits bother to teach us about love? Because love is all there is. Think you’ve heard that before? We don’t think so. Join host and shaman, Christina Pratt, as she explores Love as you’ve never heard it before. What is it love really? Why do you need it? Where do you find it? And, most importantly, how do we cultivate this most powerful essence energy in our lives? Let’s face facts: couples are not necessarily in love, love is fleeting, and love always seems to show up where it shouldn’t. Perhaps we don’t really understand True Love as well as we think we do. From the beginning of our lives the very human flaws of the adults around us shape what we believe about love. Love is shaped, contorted, limited, and defined by our childhood experience. One of the most valuable uses of a contemporary shamanic skill set in every day life is to learn to live in love. When we are in love everything feels possible, we find humor in the quirks of life, a song in our heart and lightness in our step. And through shamanic skills you can be in love in any moment whether or not you have discovered the love of your life or even want to.


  • August 24, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Shamanism and Sex

    “Sex is meant to be a mainline to Spirit for anyone,” explains shaman and host, Christina Pratt. “Spirit is constantly teaching that being in right relationship with others requires a robust and healthy sex life—at least with your self.” Join us this week as we continue the summer “blockbuster” series by looking into what shamanism has to teach us about the big issues—death, life, love and sex. In some traditional cultures the shaman or the diviner has a literally sexual relationship with his/her helping spirits in the spirit world. In all shamanic cultures a true working relationship with Spirit is at least energetically and spiritually intimate. While this is an interesting fact to throw around at cocktail parties, what is more interesting is “why?” What are the spirits trying to teach us about interconnection, Oneness and the transmission of energies? First, that the capacity for intimacy is essential for mental, emotional, and physical health. Second, that the path to a robust and fulfilling sex life can be lead by Spirit. And finally, that a path to Spirit can be found in the paradoxical grace of the intimacy found at the heart of orgasmic pleasure.


  • August 17, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Shamanism and Life

    What are the powerful and precise teachings about living life that we learn from the practice of shamanism? Our most popular guest, Martin Brennan, joins shaman and host, Christina Pratt, to share the universal and important life lessons he has learned from shamanism. Join us this week for Martin’s list of the five things necessary for a robust and rich life filled with laughter, good work, and good relationship. 1. The balance of focus and surrender, humility and empowerment needed for successful shamanic journeying is precisely the stance needed to enter in to right relationship with others and ultimately the self. 2. Sacrifice is essential to engage spirit in the discovery of your true calling. 3. If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing in ritual, which allows depth in transformation and expression. 4. There is incredible power in the spirit world to help you, but you must ask. And finally, use your life to transform you; that’s what its there for. This week we continue the summer “blockbuster” series as we look into what shamanism has to teach us about the big issues—death, life, love and sex.


  • August 10, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Shamanism and Death

    “The things we learn about life from working with the dead,” says shaman and host, Christina Pratt, “are timeless and priceless.” One of the shaman’s traditional roles is the psychopomp, or guide of souls. A psychopomp escorts the newly deceased souls to the afterlife, providing safe passage and often comfort or guidance in reconciling life and letting go. And on that journey the dead do tell tales... We are precisely who we have crafted ourselves to be with our lives. Nothing changes at death. The dead teach us that is critically important to live well and to live fully now. What ever you are cultivating now with your time and attention will be your legacy. Will your legacy be one of depression, shopping, and chasing tail? Or will you hand on something of meaning and purpose to your descendants? When the dead do not receive the guidance that they need to complete the journey or they simply can’t let go, their unresolved energies remain, plaguing their descendants with a legacy of the same habits and addictions. Working to clear the energies of the dead teaches us that everything matters, everything can be changed with the help of spirit, and there is always hope. This week we begin a summer “blockbuster” series as we look into what shamanism has to teach us about the big issues—death, life, love and sex


  • August 3, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Remembering True Initiation: The Initiation Series Wrap-up

    In the opening of Curing our Cultural Sickness: The Initiation Series on June 8th, shaman and host, Christina Pratt, presented the hypothesis that the lack of meaningful or functional initiation from childhood to adulthood is at the root of much of our cultural sickness. In the weeks that followed Christina interviewed a diverse range of shamans in the hopes that in hearing about the qualities of the experiences that actually transformed them from many different perspectives we could remember again what true initiation is. We learned that humility, the willingness to be empty, and asking our questions from that uncertain stance is essential to engage the initiatory potential in experience. We learned that pain, sacrifice, and a willingness to feel are all critical. And finally we learned that allowing oneself to be transformed not once, but at least three layers deeply into ourselves is necessary to even begin to call an experience “initiatory.” Join us this week as we explore all that we learned from these stories of initiation and what that means for our culture going forward.


  • July 27, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    The Initiation Series: John-Luke Edwards

    This week we resume our Initiation Series: Curing our Cultural Sickness with out final guest, Reverend Shaman John-Luke Edwards, MA, PhD. It is our hope that in hearing the stories of a diverse range of contemporary initiation experiences—that have functioned to truly transform individuals into shamans—that we will come to remember what initiation truly means. John-Luke explains that initiation changes the quality of ones relationship with spirit, forging an intimate relationship that is part remembering what already exists and part noticing in oneself what no longer exists. Sharing stories from his many initiation experiences, we will explore degrees of initiation, the importance of being empty, and the need to sacrifice to allow any initiation to run its full course. John-Luke is an ordained shaman of The Wolven Path, which is a rebirth of an ancient Celtic/Druidic form of shamanism. Shamanic Clergy illuminate the path for others by setting their own hearts and souls aflame; they share, teach, and proclaim the Shamanic way of living. We will discuss the uniqueness of this path, the power of ritual to transform, and the dangers of social niceties along the path of the contemporary shaman.

    For more information go to www.circleofgreatmystery.com


  • July 20, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Working with Plant Medicines

    Author, professor, and peacemaker, Stephan Beyer, joins host, Christina Pratt, this week to discuss the use of plant medicines (plant hallucinogens or entheogens) in shamanism. Drawing on his vast experience as an academic and deep experience as a shamanic practitioner, Steve will talk with us about the personalities of several of the sacred plants used in traditional shamanic healing and ritual. We will explore their relevance in shamanic practices outside of these traditions, the contemporary search for healing and transformation, the “selling of spirituality”, and what can we say about authenticity with these powerful teachers. Perhaps most importantly we will discuss these plants as teachers who open to us “the dark and luminous realm of the spirits.”

    In his new book, Singing to the Plants: A Guide to Mestizo Shamanism in the Upper Amazon Stephan seeks “to understand one form of shamanism, its relationship to other shamanisms, and its survival in the new global economy, through anthropology, ethnobotany, cognitive psychology, legal history, and his own experiences with two master healers of the Amazon.”

    For more information go to http://www.singingtotheplants.com/


  • July 13, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Outlaw Shamanism in the UK

    How do we honor our traditions and still keep our shamanic practices alive and potent? How do we walk that interface between traditional teachings and spirit driven innovation to discover how to rise to the call of what is needed today in an effective shamanic practice? Contemporary shamanic practitioners are a hugely diverse lot. And yet, we are all faced with the same challenge—the need to be effective in our work. Shaman and host, Christina Pratt, will discuss “Outlaw Shamanism,” a new weekend class she will be offering in September in Glastonbury, Somerset in the UK. The weekend is designed by Spirit for participants to explore the dynamic tensions in the life of a contemporary practitioner. The challenge in looking only to the past is getting lost in the forms and not recognizing the functions that made the rituals and ceremonies of the past effective. The challenge looking only to the present is practicing forms that no longer function, accepting simplistic “answers from spirit” because there are no standards, and ignoring the effect of communities that do not respect the cultivation and energy renewal necessary for shamanic practitioners to practice with heartfelt power and without burning out. In essence we must learn what to bend and what must be broken.

    For registration and information about Outlaw Shamanism contact: office@isleofavalonfoundation.com or www.isleofavalonfoundation.com
    or 01458 833933.


  • July 6, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Shamanic Practitioners Conference in the UK

    This week we take a break from our Initiation Series to support our friends and shamanic colleagues in the UK.. Howard and Elsa Malpas of Warrior in the Heart in London are presenting the 4th UK Residential the Society of Shamanic Practitioners Conference with the help of Nick Breeze Wood of Sacred Hoop Magazine. The conference runs September 9-12th at Gaunts House in Dorset, England. Elsa, Howard and Nick all join us this week to talk about the conference, the beauty of Gaunts House’s 2000 acres, and the rich and diverse group of teachers and healers who will be presenting that this year’s conference. “The conference is a gathering for those honouring the shamanic way. It is an opportunity to share sacred space with people who are dedicated to teaching and practicing the ways of the shaman and bringing that ancient spirituality into the present and future.” The theme this year is Dancing with the Cycles of Life and Jonathan Horwitz, a true elder in contemporary shamanism in Europe, will weave the days together with “The Shaman’s Thread: The Unseen Rhythms of Life.” The days begin with meditations and end in community ritual or ceremony. Your host, Christina Pratt, will be presenting Awakening the Courageous Heart on the 11th. You can find out everything you need to know about the conference at http://www.shamanconference.co.uk/


  • June 29, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    The Initiation Series: Gretchen Crilly McKay

    Sangoma (shaman), Gretchen Crilly McKay is our guest this week in our Initiation Series: Curing our Cultural Sickness. She joins us to discuss her traditional kuthwasa (initiation) experiences in Swaziland, Africa, under the mentorship of Zulu shaman, P.H. Mntshali. It is our hope that in hearing the stories of a diverse range of contemporary initiation experiences—that have functioned to truly transform individuals into shamans—that we will come to remember what initiation truly means. Gretchen’s admitted love affair with Africa, the “home” of her soul, began decades ago. A consultation there with sangoma, P.H. Mntshali—who would become her mentor—revealed that her life had been difficult because she had not followed the path her ancestors had chosen for her. Through the traditional initiatory path of the sangoma, Gretchen became the woman she was meant to be. Gretchen’s private shamanic practice is in Southern California where she seamlessly combines traditional African practices, like throwing the bones, with cross-cultural shamanic practices, like soul retrieval, extraction, and healing with spiritual light to serve her clients and students. Her extensive calendar of classes, apprenticeship & mentoring, and two year advanced training can be found at http://ancestralwisdom.com/


  • June 22, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    The Initiation Series: Michael Dunning

    Shaman-healer, Michael Dunning is our guest this week in our Initiation Series: Curing our Cultural Sickness. He joins us to discuss his exceptional initiation experiences with a Yew tree in Scotland and how they transformed him. It is our hope that in hearing the stories of a diverse range of contemporary initiation experiences—that have functioned to truly transform individuals into shamans—that we will come to remember what initiation truly means. Michael gradually became aware of his calling as a shaman-healer following a near -death encounter with an elemental spirit in the far north of Scotland. A second near-death experience occurred several years later that entirely destroyed his health. Michael began to experience regular visions, prolonged out - of - body states and intense physical pain. Managing his daily life became a great challenge. He was finally rescued by a friend who lived in a small cottage close to a 2000 year -old, female yew tree. This marked the beginning of a ten-year period of healing and a shamanic initiation through nature, which took place under the vast enclosure of the tree. Michael now teaches Yewshamanism throughout New England where he is a biodynamic craniosacral therapist and teacher.


  • June 15, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    The Initiation Series: Desiree Demars

    Healer, Desiree DeMars is our first guest in our Initiation Series: Curing our Cultural Sickness. She will join us to discuss her own initiation experiences and how they transformed her. It is our hope that in hearing the stories of a diverse range of contemporary initiation experiences—that have functioned to truly transform individuals into shamans—that we will come to remember what initiation truly means. Desiree is a co-founder of The Center for Shamanic Healing in the San Francisco Bay Area. The Center is dedicated to bridging the ancient and ancestral wisdom of shamanic and spiritual healing with direct engagement with spirit in a contemporary life. Desiree’s initiations have occurred over time and place. She travels extensively, often stopping to live for months or years in places that call to her. She began living a holistic life 30 years ago building a green, self-sufficient homestead in Northern Wisconsin. Her holistic lifestyle has evolved into 20 years studying herbal remedies, live food nutrition, several bodywork and energywork modalities, and shamanic healing arts. Her travels have brought her in contact with indigenous healers in Peru, Ecuador, Bali, Hawaii, Mexico and Nepal. If we are really lucky we will get to tell us her story of initiation by scorpion…


  • June 8, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Curing Our Cultural Sickness: The Initiation Series

    This week begins a series exploring initiation and spiritual maturity. “It is my hypothesis,” says host and shaman Christina Pratt, “that the lack of meaningful or functional initiation is at the root of our cultural sicknesses from greed and irresponsible leadership to ecological waste to psychoemotional illness and pharmaceutical abuse to teen suicide and violence.” To begin we will explore what a functional initiation involves and how shamans see it at the core of the healthy psychoemotional and psychospiritual development of the individual. Given that we will look at two things: first, how the lack of initiation and the resulting spiritual immaturity leads to our cultural sicknesses and second we will look at what you can do to begin to open yourself up to the initiation into adulthood that is wanting to happen. Over the next several weeks a diverse array of guests will share their initiatory experiences along the path they walked to become practicing contemporary shamans. This series will end by looking at the parallels and lessons we can learn from those who have walked the path of initiation and now live in a way that models for us spiritual maturity and the possibility of curing our chronic cultural sicknesses.we can learn from those who have walked the path of initiation and now live in a way that models for us spiritual maturity and the possibility of curing our chronic cultural sicknesses.

  • June 1, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Soul’s Purpose: The Core of Well-Being

    One of the highest values held in shamanic cultures is the fact that each individual brings to this world a unique soul’s purpose. The gift of that soul’s purpose has never been seen before and will never be seen again if you do not live it. This isn’t karma and there are no second chances. This is the one moment to live that unique genius. This value was held in various ways by pre-contact shamanic peoples around the world. To live one’s purpose was believed to be at the core of one’s well-being. “I see this, or more precisely the lack of it, to be true today,” says host and shaman, Christina Pratt. “When we are living far from our right work, spending 8-10 hours a day in a job that is not meaningful to us, ignoring the body’s cries for balance, and making sure that our sleep is so short or shallow that we never touch into the call of the soul then it’s no wonder we are unwell.” Join us this week as we explore how to catch the scent of your soul’s purpose and bring your life back on track with your passion. By changing this one thing— your relationship with your unique purpose—you can restore well-being in all aspects of your life.

  • May 25, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Transforming Pain

    Join us this week as we explore the application of shamanic skills to transform pain, whether it is physical, emotional, mental, or spiritual. “In the late 1980’s Rusty Berkus said that all earthly pain is our inability to let go of something that wants to be set free. Since I was in a great deal of pain at that time,” says host and shaman, Christina Pratt, “I paid attention to these words. Working with them I learned to unravel mental, physical, spiritual, and emotional pain. I really didn’t understand this fully until Shamanism showed me that even with the pains a person truly doesn’t seem to be holding onto, energetically somewhere something is being held onto, even if it is held by the unresolved energies of the ancestors.” Often this is exactly why we need a shaman to go journey for us and find the holding that is in another realm and find the means for release. In the end after the release there is a gift. In all of our suffering, not only is there the thing to be set free, but in that freedom is a gift. And that gift is most often your self.

  • May 18, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Working Effectively with Spirit (II)

    This week host and shaman, Christina Pratt, answers listener’s questions about working effectively with spirit. At the core of shamanism is the individual’s direct relationship with his or her own helping spirits. While the techniques of shamanic skills are fairly easy, mastery is a life long endeavor. The skills of the shaman, like journeying, that are used to connect more clearly with our helping spirits are designed to enhance our natural human intuitive skills. What this relationship offers that meditation and messages from the Higher Self do not is the ability to ask, “where am I lying to myself?” and “how to I get out of my own way?” Christina explores how we might navigate the interface between traditional practices and our contemporary lives, whether or not we need engage in a battle between dark and light, and the critical importance of working with the spirits of the land where ever we are. In all that we explore this week, the right use of shamanic skills keeps coming back to humility and power. Cultivation of humility and power in equal parts is the hallmark of a mature shamanic practitioner.

  • May 11, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Shamanism and Recovery from Addiction

    Addiction touches every one of us, particularly in America. If you aren’t an addict yourself you love someone who is. Addictions come in all shapes and sizes from the drama of substance abuse to neatly packaged, socially accepted addictions like coffee and sugar. We craft addictions to emotional states, creating the same scenarios in life again and again fueled by the emotion of choice, like anger, adrenaline, or falling in love, to name the more popular today. We can become addicted to any state of being and we do. And they all rob us of our capacity to choose. This limits our creativity and hobbles the experience of true joy. Shamanism with its unique perspective and relationship with the helping spirits allows us to see that our patterns are not us. Join us this week with host and shaman, Christina Pratt, as she explores the power in shamanic process to change the unchangeable. With the helping spirits supporting our Authentic Self, we are able to identify what we are truly after in the heart of the addiction, release the old patterns around that heart, and retrieve what is deeply meaningful to us. With shamanic skills we can free our selves to experience our true unique genius.

  • May 4, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Shamanism and PTSD Recovery

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is the aftermath of a healthy, normal response to threatening, unpredictable, out of control situations. Within the complex inner world of someone suffering from PTSD lies multiple events of soul loss along with other psychoemotional and psychospiritual dynamics. Shamanism, with its expertise in soul retrieval and unraveling the wounds of the soul, is a critical part of the recovery process for PTSD. PTSD is debilitating, leaving people with nightmares and pervasive fear, deep scars and emotional numbness, and often uncontrollable flashbacks to the event. It can be caused by any overwhelming, violent event, whether large scale like war or personal scale like rape. PTSD can affect not only those who experience the traumatic event, but those who witness it, who offer care, who pick up the pieces after, and those who live with a loved one who is experiencing PTSD. We can all look around us and see that we have largely failed to bring healing to those with PTSD in spite of our medical system’s best efforts. This week, shaman and host, Christina Pratt explores what PTSD is from a shamanic perspective and what we need to do as care providers and community to heal it. From this unique perspective we can bring not only healing to those with PTSD, but heart, meaning, and hope to this ever growing problem in America.

  • April 27, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Stephan Beyer and Shamanism and Plant Medicines

    Author, professor, and peacemaker, Stephan Beyer, joins us this week to discuss his new book, Singing to the Plants: A Guide to Mestizo Shamanism in the Upper Amazon. Stephan explains, “Singing to the Plants seeks to understand one form of shamanism, its relationship to other shamanisms, and its survival in the new global economy, through anthropology, ethnobotany, cognitive psychology, legal history, and my own experiences with two master healers of the Amazon.” Join us as we discuss the use of plant medicines (plant hallucinogens or entheogens) in shamanism in the Upper Amazon and its relevance—should we or shouldn’t we—in shamanic practices outside of these traditions. We will reach into the depths of Stephan’s personal experience to discuss the healing potential of shamanism as well as the potential to do harm through attack sorcery. Ultimately we will explore the idea that shamanism is “ irreducibly social” such that all shamanic healing as well as harming takes place within a cultural context where shared values like trust, reciprocity, or generosity are at the root of personal illness and suffering.

  • April 20, 2010: listen (left click), download (right click)

    Tom Cowan and Shamanism Without Borders

    Tom Cowan, a shamanic practitioner of Celtic visionary and healing techniques, joins us this week to discuss “Self in Service,” the Society of Shamanic Practitioners 7th annual conference. Tom is a much loved teacher and an internationally respected author, lecturer, and tour leader. He is also a founding board member of the SSP. This year’s conference is the first exploration as a community into of one aspect of the SSP’s mission: learning to practice shamanism without borders and to respond to the voices of the wounded within the Land. These will be intense days of experiential shamanism. This year the conference format is radically changed to allow for large and small groups to focus healing responses to places and beings that have suffered traumatic experiences. This new structure is designed so that all the steps involved in responding to trauma from natural disasters are activities attendees shall undertake and do together, including learning how to tend and grow themselves. Fundamental to Shamanism Without Borders is the belief that as people practicing this medicine, it is incumbent to learn what the disasters teach us individually while protecting ourselves from being part of the disaster.

  • April 13, 2010:  listen (left click)download (right click)

    Two Paths of True Transformation

    True Transformation delivers us to a new state of being from which there is no going back. “Today most people are aware of transformation through Death and Rebirth,” says host and shaman, Christina Pratt. “They may not like it, but they understand intuitively that a death is required for the rebirth that allows true transformation to run its course.” The American weakness here is our cultural fear of death, which leads to our refusal to let go of anything, even those things we dearly long to be rid of, and our inability to surrender control. Shamanism offers us not only a remedy for our fear of death, but a second path to true transformation—Transformation of the Enemy to Ally, or Transformation through Love. While love sounds like a respite from death and fear, it is the more challenging path. Transformation through love requires that we truly see the enemy within ourselves and love it. For most the prospects of loving the enemy within makes embracing death, fear, and surrender look like fun on a great date night out.

 2017 - 2016 - 2015 - 2014 - 2013 - 2012 - 2011- 2010
 

Talk Live On-Air
Call-in:
512.772.1938

Skype: call-in1 Talk Live On-Air with Skype



Be a Co-Creator


Co-Creator's visitors




 
 

 
     
   
 
Copyright © 2008 - 2017 Co-Creator Network